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第 8 章 Sharing Repositories with others

目录

8.1. Setting up a git server

8.1. Setting up a git server

First we need to setup a user with a home folder. We will store all the repositories in this users home folder.

		
sudo adduser git
		
		

Rather than giving out the password to the git user account use ssh keys to login so that you can have multiple developers connect securely and easily.

Next we will make a repository. For this example we will work with a repository called example. Login as the user git and add the repository.

login to remote server

		
ssh git@REMOTE_SERVER
		
		

once logged in

		
sudo mkdir example.git
cd example.git
sudo git --bare init
Initialized empty Git repository in /home/git/example.git/
		
		

That’s all there is to creating a repository. Notice we named our folder with a .git extension.

Also notice the ‘bare’ option. By default the git repository assumes that you’ll be using it as your working directory, so git stores the actual bare repository files in a .git directory alongside all the project files. Since we are setting up a remote server we don’t need copies of the files on the filesystem. Instead, all we need are the deltas and binary objects of the repository. By setting ‘bare’ we tell git not to store the current files of the repository only the diffs. This is optional as you may have need to be able to browse the files on your remote server.

Finally all you need to do is add your files to the remote repository. We will assume you don’t have any files yet.

		
mkdir example
cd example
git init
touch README
git add README
git commit -m 'first commit'
git remote add origin git@REMOTE_SERVER:example.git
git push origin master
		
		

replace REMOTE_SERVER with your server name or IP

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